Author Archives: iaizzi

New section of my website: Resources

I have to admit, a draft of my new Resources page has been sitting around for more than year. I realized last week that it just needed a little bit of work to clean it up. It’s definitely a work in progress, but I think there are some useful links in there. The main sections right now are on mental health, diversity and accessibility, but I will be adding more content over time.

If you spot any problems or dead links, please let me know. And if you have any ideas of links or resources that I can add, that’s great too!

FECS APS March Meeting Mini Grants

Application deadline: January 15, 2021 11:59pm EST
Apply now!

The 2021 March Meeting will be held completely online. In order to support early career physicists, FECS is running a one-time “mini grant” program to cover the cost of registration (up to $165). Note: in order to receive that low rate, you must register for the meeting by the early bird deadline of January 25, 2021.

To be considered, applicants must be recent PhD recipients (past 5 years), present a poster or talk at the meeting, and be current members of the APS Forum for Early Career Scientists (free to join, link below). Women, underrepresented minorities and candidates who can clearly demonstrate a need for funding are especially encouraged to apply. Applications are due January 15, 2021 11:59pm EST. If you have any questions, please contact me.

To join FECS, follow this link and sign into your APS account.

Apply now!

P.S. We will also be offering grants for the April meeting. More information will be posted on Engage soon.

FECS election results and new Executive Committee members

One January 1, I started my term as Chair-Elect for the APS Forum for Early Career Scientists (FECS). This is a three-year position; I will serve as Chair-Elect, Chair and then Past Chair in 2021, 2022 and 2023 respectively. I have already served on the Executive Committee for the past two years as a Member-at-Large, and I am excited to continue serving this community. On behalf of FECS, I will also be serving as an Ex-Officio member of the APS Committee on Careers and Professional Development (CCPD) and I’m looking forward to shaping the crucial career programming that APS offers its members.

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APS FECS Elections: vote for me!

I’m thrilled to tell you all that I’m a candidate for the Chair line of the APS Forum for Early Career Scientists! This is a three year position consisting of one year each as chair elect, chair and past chair. I’ve serving as a member of the FECS Executive Committee for the past two years and I’m excited to be able to continue my service with FECS. If you’re a member of FECS, please vote for me! Polls close on November 20; you should have an email in your inbox now with the subject line “APS FECS Election”. I’ve included my bio and candidate statement below.

If you’re a member of APS and not a member of FECS, you should sign up! I don’t know if you would be able to vote, but it’s free and it’s a way to encourage APS to support postdocs other early career scientists (and to get support yourself)!

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Title page of Ising model paper

Just published: field-stabilized frozen states in the AFM Ising model

I’m thrilled to announce that my first single-author paper has just been published in Physical Review E:

Field-induced freezing in the unfrustrated Ising antiferromagnet
Adam Iaizzi,
Physical Review E 102, 032112 (2020) [paywall] 
[free PDF] [arXiv]

This paper is a continuation of the theme of my research career, which could be loosely described: “try adding a magnetic field to an antiferromagnet and see if something interesting happens.” In this case, I added a magnetic field to the classical 2D Ising antiferromagnet and studied it with the simplest implementation of Monte Carlo: the Metropolis(-Rosenbluth-Teller) algorithm. At low temperatures I found that simulations never reached the ground state. Instead, they get trapped in local energy minima from which they never escape: frozen states with finite magnetization. There are so many of these frozen states available that you are effectively guaranteed to cross one before you can reach the correct ground state. These frozen states can be described by simple rules based on stable local configurations.

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Call for nominations: APS Forum for Early Career Scientists (FECS) Executive Committee

The Forum for Early Career Scientists (FECS) is an APS forum dedicated to addressing the unique challenges of early career scientists, which include postdocs, recent PhDs in industry, junior faculty, research associates and so on. FECS is one of the newest and fastest-growing APS fora and we’re looking for nominations of new people to join our executive board. Nominations are due Monday 8/31.

We are seeking nominations from people in all career stages, but since this is a group dedicated to early career scientists, we need early career scientists on our executive board. More information on how to get involved after the break.

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bootCampEx: My practical guide to running simulations on a computing cluster

I developed these notes and exercises as part of a tutorial on how to use the Kao Group’s computing cluster. Although some of the details are specific to this specific cluster, much of the material could be useful for anyone getting started in computational physics, so I thought I would share it here. The materials are posted on github.com/adazi/bootCampEx and the best place to start is by reading README.md

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AAAS STPF logo

What’s next? AAAS Policy Fellowship!

Friday was my last day as a postdoc at NTU. My next step isn’t another postdoc or even a faculty position; instead, I’ll be learning about public policy as a AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellow (STPF)! My placement is in the Department of Energy, where I’ll be working on the diplomatic and legal arrangements that support international scientific collaboration.

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